Sex Therapy Online and Using Skype

Sex Therapy Online and using Skype

The ability to remain in the security of home and even of anonymity has made online working highly attractive and productive for sexually related issues.

Sessions can be conducted by phone, Facetime or Skype and even by email (though I regard this as less cost-effective than more immediate contact methods.)

Using these forms of connection helps overcome a major hurdle in dealing with sexual matters: shame. It is shame that keeps people hidden in their homes and only allowing themselves to enjoy their activities when they are sure they are not to be discovered.

This ‘hiding out’ generates conflict, however, because the individuals or couples who are concealing their activities are also aware that there is nothing inherently to be ashamed of. It is purely a societal judgment that they fear and they may also be aware that if they were in a different society then there’d be no such taboo.

For individuals and couples who enjoy exotic sexual behaviours, the ability to reveal themselves as they truly are, and to engage in meaningful dialogue – not necessarily restricted to their particular sexual preferences – can be hugely liberating.

Examples include a transvestite male, shyly revealing himself to another person for perhaps the first time; individuals with a range of fantasies that they wish to explore and defuse; a power-exchange or DD couple, presenting in role while they discuss the vanilla disputes they may have over finances or child-rearing.

Working over online video defuses much of the tension and fear around sexual difference. It ends loneliness, stimulates new ideas, and triggers greater creativity in all aspects of life. Couples or even polyamorous groups can join in from different locations. Individuals can use the distance to overcome their shyness and their shame.

By negating shame, the work can also protect the male or female individual from risky escapes such as alcohol and other drugs, self-harming behaviours, workaholism and self-isolation.

The key word here is ‘acceptance’. When you find acceptance and understanding for your behaviour, even if you continue to keep it totally secret from society, you achieve a level of liberation that profoundly impacts everything you do.

All behaviour is purposive. Our challenge is to locate and understand the purpose and then to enjoy the behaviour.

If you or you and your partner would like to explore the benefits of this kind of relating, please contact me using the form below.